Medical Board Metes Out Discipline Based on a Police Report

If you’re a doctor or other licensed healthcare professional in California, remember. Your board or agency can discipline you for alleged conduct in a police report even if you’re never charged with or convicted of anything.

Just this week, the California Court of Appeal ruled that the medical board could discipline a doctor based on a police report even though his criminal case was dismissed.

Here’s what happened. The doctor was arrested for possessing cocaine. As part of his plea deal, he successfully completed a drug treatment program, and the case was dismissed. But the medical board learned of the arrest and filed its own case against him. At the hearing, the doctor argued the board’s case was based entirely on the arrest report, which was a problem because the Penal Code said you can’t do that.

The case pitted two statutes against each other. On one hand, the Penal Code says that when you complete a program like the one this doctor did, your arrest record can’t be used “in any way” to deny you a professional license or certificate. But the Business and Professions Code says that, “notwithstanding any other provision of law,” an agency that oversees the healing arts can do just that. It can rely on an arrest report to discipline you even if you successfully completed such a program.

It wasn’t the first time this question had come up, but remarkably, it was an issue of first impression in the law, meaning it was the first time a court of appeal had to decide it.

The court, though, had no trouble deciding that the second statute was a straightforward exception to the first one. The clincher was that the Penal Code was amended this year to make that interpretation explicit. So the doctor lost.

In these cases, you should begin to defend your professional license and livelihood at the same time you begin to defend against a criminal case or investigation. Which is immediately. We can help you do both.

New Year’s Resolutions

Speaking of compliance, here are two businesses that ended the year resolving charges they violated U.S. trade sanctions by dealing with blocked countries, people, or entities.

Both cases show how the government enforces its sanctions regime, and they illustrate how an ounce of prevention can beat a pound of cure. Both cases were brought by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, or OFAC, which is an agency within the Department of Treasury.

The first case concerns a dental-supply company that agreed to pay $1.2 million to settle charges that it violated the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations. The government alleged that, from the end of 2009 through the middle of 2012, the company exported 37 shipments of dental equipment to distributors in other countries knowing, or having reason to know, they would end up in Iran.

According to the government, it wasn’t an egregious case because the exports were likely eligible for a license if the company had only applied for one. But it didn’t, and that ended up costing it a lot more on the back end.

The second case concerns a luxury-goods company that agreed to pay $300,000-plus to settle charges that it violated the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Sanctions Regulations. The government alleged that, from October 2010 to April 2011, the company exported four shipments of jewelry to a Hong Kong entity that was on OFAC’s list of blocked persons and interests. The blocked entity’s name and address squarely matched those of the ship-to party, but the company didn’t flag the transaction before shipping the goods.

According to the government, this wasn’t an egregious case either, but if you add up the settlement costs and legal fees, it sure does eat into the margin.

Happy 2018, California

Let’s celebrate because the new year marks the dawn of the state’s licensing program for commercial, recreational cannabis. It follows the voters’ approval of Proposition 64, the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, which we wrote about last year.

But hold your horses, too, because it’s just the beginning. Earlier this month, the state launched its online application system, and two weeks ago, it issued its first batch of temporary licenses to retailers, distributors, microbusinesses, and testing laboratories. These licenses go effective January 1 and allow previously accredited businesses to do business while they complete the application process.

So far, only a few cities and counties are ready to go on January 1. Others, like Los Angeles, have been getting ready and will start taking applications within days or weeks. Some have opted out entirely. And most haven’t decided one way or another.

It’s a work in progress, then, and the best advice for now is to cover your backside. Run your business by the book, and invest in high-quality legal research, analysis, and representation. Invest in compliance, in other words, because it’s the only sustainable way in the end.

In the meantime, seven more states are poised to join the growing majority that has chosen to legalize, regulate, and tax medical or recreational pot.

So it may just be the beginning, but the new year looks bright.

SEC Chair Offers Advice on Bitcoin and Its Ilk

This week, the chair of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission weighed in on crypto-currencies as well as ICOs or initial coin offerings. With the price of bitcoin nearing $20,000, it probably comes at the right time. You may have been wondering yourself: What are the rules for this stuff? Are they being followed? And what are the risks in these markets?

Here is a summary of his advice for both Main Street and Wall Street.

For Main Street

These are the folks at home who may be tempted to jump on the bandwagon.

  1. Understand that, for now, it’s the Wild West out there. The SEC hasn’t approved any crypto-currency-related funds or products for listing and trading, and no one has registered an ICO with the Commission. Don’t let anyone today tell you otherwise.
  2. Do your homework. If you choose to invest in these things, ask plenty of questions and demand clear answers. The Chair’s statement includes a list of sample questions to consider. Be especially careful if a pitch sounds too good to be true or you’re pressured to act quickly.
  3. Understand that these markets cross borders, so your money may travel overseas even without your knowledge. Once there, you may not ever be able to get it back.

For Wall Street

These are market professionals like brokers, dealers, lawyers, advisers, accountants, and exchanges.

  1. Although ICOs can be effective ways to raise money, you have to follow the securities laws if it constitutes an offering of securities. So ask yourself: Is this offering a security? Is it an investment contract? Is it, in other words, an investment of money in a pooled venture that expects to derive profit from the efforts of others? If you’re not clear on this then you need a lawyer because the Commission will look past the form of a transaction to its substance. So just calling it a currency doesn’t settle the question. We blogged recently about this fact-intensive inquiry here.
  2. If you handle transactions in crypto-currency, you should treat them as if cash were being handed from one party to the other. You should know your customer and mind anti-money-laundering laws whenever you allow payments in crypto-currencies, allow their purchase on margin, or otherwise use them to facilitate securities transactions.

Expunging Criminal Records in California

It ain’t just for kids, after all. Anyone who’s eligible can petition to expunge a criminal conviction in California. Here’s what you need to know.

Like we explained last week, the term “expungement” is a misnomer because it doesn’t erase the conviction or wipe the slate clean. But that’s still how lawyers and judges will refer to it. Technically, it’s called a dismissal under Penal Code section 1203.4 or other such section. So you’re still going to have a rap sheet, in other words.

But it will add a line item to your rap sheet that shows the case was dismissed. If you had pleaded guilty before, the court will permit you to withdraw your plea. If you were convicted at trial, the court will set aside that verdict. Either way, the court will then dismiss the case.

In most situations, that means you can legally and truthfully say that you don’t have a conviction. That can help on a job application, for example, though the rule is different for public employers like law-enforcement agencies. In all situations, you can at least say that the conviction was dismissed, because it was.

[Update: Beginning January 1, 2018, many employers will no longer be able to ask about convictions on a job application. But there’s more to it than that, as we explain here.]

Most employers aren’t even supposed to ask about convictions that have been dismissed, and they’re not supposed to rely on them in their decision-making. The exceptions include public employers like law-enforcement agencies.

Most licensing boards, on the other hand, can ask about them, and you should answer by disclosing both the conviction and the dismissal. They’re not supposed to deny a license basely solely on a conviction that has been expunged or dismissed.

You’re eligible to expunge a felony or misdemeanor if you were sentenced to probation or the county jail. If you successfully completed probation or had it terminated early then you are entitled to the dismissal. If you didn’t then you can still win if you can persuade the court of your rehabilitation. If you went to county jail on a felony then you’re eligible one or two years after the end of your sentence; it depends on whether you served a split sentence that included post-release supervision (one year) or a full sentence in jail (two years). Or, if you didn’t get probation on a misdemeanor then you’re eligible if it’s been over a year since you were sentenced, and you’ve completed that sentence and otherwise done well.

You’re not eligible if you were sentenced to state prison, unless you would go to county jail for the same offense today or the court suspended the execution of your prison sentence and put you on probation instead. You’re also not eligible for certain sex offenses involving minors, including child pornography or statutory rape if you were 21 or older and the minor was younger than sixteen.

So how do you do it? Here’s a guide from the official website of the California courts that can help you do it yourself. But you should check your own county’s rules and forms, too. Here’s the link for Orange County, for example. Or, if you can afford it, get a lawyer. He or she will navigate the process for you and help you put your best foot forward. Plus, you may not ever have to go to court yourself.

The CURES For What Ails You

Speaking of prescription drugs, almost every state now has a prescription-drug monitoring program (or PDMP). The goal is to curb prescription-drug abuse by discouraging pill-pushing and doctor-shopping. So whether you’re a patient or provider, you should pay attention because law enforcement and licensing boards are watching.

In California, for example, the program is called CURES: the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System. By law, pharmacies must report to CURES every prescription for a Schedule II, III, or IV drug within seven days of dispensing it. And pretty soon, under a law passed last year, doctors will be required to check CURES before prescribing such drugs to a patient for the first time and every four months after that during treatment.

Last week, the California Supreme Court ruled that the California Medical Board could freely access CURES at any time. It didn’t need to get a warrant or show good cause beforehand. The doctor who was being investigated argued that this violated the privacy of his patients. But the Court held that, on balance, the Board’s access was justified by the need to protect the public from drug abuse and protect patients from impaired or negligent doctors.

Even if your state’s law is different, remember that federal law remains supreme. Last month, a federal court decided a case in which the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) subpoenaed data from Oregon’s PDMP. Unlike California’s program, Oregon required all agencies—even federal ones—to get a court order before it would respond to a subpoena. It sued to compel the DEA to comply with its law, but it lost. Federal law authorizes the DEA to issue subpoenas on its own, so Oregon couldn’t force it to follow state law.

The Restoration of Rights Project

Have you ever been arrested? Do you have a prior conviction?

Do you wonder whether you can clean up your record and how that affects you, if at all?

Start here. It’s called the Restoration of Rights Project, and it looks at the law in every state for restoring your rights and status after an arrest or conviction. It covers federal law, too.

For each state, the Project compiles answers to these questions:

  1. Whether and how you can seal, expunge, or dismiss your arrest or conviction.
  2. Whether and how you can restore your civil rights, like the right to vote.
  3. Whether and how your state’s laws affect your chance of landing a job or license, losing one, or getting it back.
  4. Whether your state has a regular process to apply for a pardon and how often it grants one.
  5. Whether and how you can stop having to register as a sex offender.

It’s a great resource not just for lawyers and the courts but for, in its words, “the millions of Americans with a criminal record who are seeking to put their past behind them.”

When Medicare Says You Can’t Sit With Us

Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new regulations on its power to exclude healthcare providers and suppliers from participation in a federal healthcare program. The agency excludes some 3,500 people or entities per year. You’ll want to avoid being one of them.

Here are some important takeaways.

The agency is empowered to cast a wider net. It may exclude not just the providers and suppliers who submit claims or receive payments but any person or entity that furnishes items or services for which others request or receive payment.

You can be excluded if you’re convicted of interfering with an audit. The agency doesn’t define the term “audit” for this purpose. Before, you had to have obstructed a criminal investigation, not just an audit or the like. The new rule also makes changes to the factors that extend or reduce the presumptive three-year exclusion under this provision.

You can be excluded for not providing information to support a claim even if you didn’t furnish the items or services in question. You can be excluded if you referred the items or services to others to furnish or certified that they were needed.

The agency has ten years to exclude you for false claims or illegal kickbacks. This timeframe follows the outer ten-year statute of limitations for violations of the False Claims Act. Before, there was theoretically no limit on how far back the agency could look to exclude you under these provisions.

The rule makes several changes to the aggravating and mitigating factors that extend or reduce the length of exclusions. Most of these changes affect the dollar-loss thresholds. For example, it’s now aggravating if the government’s loss amounts to $50,000 or more, when it used to be $15,000. And it’s mitigating if the loss is less than $5,000 when it used to be $1,500. Or, for excessive or unnecessary billing, it’s aggravating if the loss is $15,000 or more when that threshold used to be $1,500. Also, in most cases, it’s no longer mitigating if you provide access to care that’s otherwise not available in your area. Instead, the agency will consider that in deciding whether to exclude you rather than for how long.

You may be eligible for early reinstatement. You can request it if you were excluded because your professional license was revoked, suspended, or surrendered in a disciplinary investigation. There’s a presumption against it for the first three years that you’re excluded or for the length of your suspension or revocation, whichever is longer. There’s no such presumption if you’re still licensed in a different state or by a different licensing authority or if you were able to get a new license after full disclosure. But you’re not eligible at all if you lost your license because of patient abuse or neglect.

CMS Puts Out New Physician Self-Referral Disclosure Protocol

If you’re a healthcare provider or supplier, take note.

Starting June 1, 2017, there is a new process for self-reporting actual or potential violations of the Stark Law to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Remember, Stark says that doctors can’t refer certain, designated health services that are payable by Medicare or Medicaid to entities in which they have a financial interest. The same goes if an immediate family member is the one with the financial interest. The entity that receives the referral can’t bill for those services, either. But exceptions apply.

Why in the world would you self-report? Well, if there is discretion to keep you in the program, your cooperation will go a long way. You’ll pay less in penalties. You’ll reduce or eliminate your liability for not reporting and returning the overpayments sooner. And you’ll probably put the matter behind you more quickly than if the government gets wind of it.

Now, there’s a new way to do it. Up to this point, you would submit your self-disclosure to CMS by letter. From June 1, you must submit a packet of forms and enclosures that you certify. You should submit all information necessary for the agency to analyze the actual or potential violation. You may also submit a cover letter with additional, relevant information.

You’re well-advised not to do any of this without appropriate counsel.

The new protocol doesn’t apply to non-Stark-related disclosures of potential fraud, waste, or abuse involving a federal healthcare program.

So if you wish to disclose actual or potential violations of other laws like the Anti-Kickback Statute, you should use a separate process for it.

After you talk to your lawyer.

 

SEC Lights Up Another Cannabis Company

In what may be a sign of maturity for the industry, the Securities and Exchange Commission has sued another marijuana-related business for violating federal securities laws.

Last month, the SEC charged a California-based company and two former executives with a classic pump-and-dump scheme. First, the Commission says, the defendants touted phony revenue to drive up the price of the company’s stock. Then they unloaded their own shares for millions of dollars. According to the complaint, much of the revenue came from a series of sham transactions with a shell company that the executives controlled. So the SEC charged them with fraud as well as offering and selling unregistered securities.

The company and one of the executives have settled the case without admitting or denying liability. The executive agreed to pay more than $12 million, among other penalties.

Meanwhile, the company has turned over a new leaf, so to speak, overhauling its management, business model, and board of directors.

The SEC will continue to scrutinize the market, however, which highlights something cannabis companies should already know: get your ducks in a row, and run your business the right way.

Puff and pass if you want, but don’t pump and dump.

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