Feds Arrest Hundreds in Healthcare Raids

Last week, the federal government conducted nationwide raids of healthcare providers and facilities based on $1.3 billion in allegedly false billings.

In one day, the feds arrested 412 people in a coordinated takedown that netted 115 doctors, nurses, and other licensed professionals. The government also brought legal action to exclude 295 providers—including doctors, nurses, and pharmacists—from further participating in federal healthcare programs.

The government says the defendants schemed to defraud Medicare, Medicaid, and Tricare, which is the health-insurance program for veterans, servicemembers, and their families. It alleges that defendants billed for prescription drugs and other treatments or services that were medically unnecessary or never even provided.

The raids were spearheaded by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Here’s DOJ’s press release about it, and here’s a factsheet by HHS that tallies up the numbers. The raids were concentrated in Florida, Texas, Michigan, California, Illinois, New York, Louisiana, and Mississippi. But they also captured targets in over two dozen other states across the country.

Man Gets Indicted By His Pacemaker

Actually, the case was indicted by a grand jury in Ohio, which charged him with arson and insurance fraud.

Apparently, the man called 911 as his home burned in the background. He said he was sleeping when the fire started and that, in a hurry, he packed a bunch of bags, broke a window with his cane, threw the bags out the window, and carried them away. He mentioned that he had a pacemaker.

The police came to suspect him of arson. They say they found gasoline on his shoes, pants, and shirt, and they believe the fire had multiple points of origin from outside the house.

So they got a search warrant for the data from his pacemaker. That gave them a historical record of his heart rate and rhythms before, during, and after the fire.

Reportedly, the data showed that the man was active when he was supposed to be asleep, and a cardiologist has said it was “highly improbable” that he could carry out the strenuous activities he described.

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