When the Doctor Is Not In

Last week, it was the California Medical Board, but Medicare ain’t playing around either, doc.

It will revoke your billing privileges if you submit inaccurate claims, and it will test the accuracy of those claims by mining data about you and your travels.

Recently, for example, the government revoked a clinic’s privileges because it determined the doctor who supposedly rendered the services wasn’t present on the dates of service. It’s not clear how the government knew that, but the implication is that it cross-referenced the doctor’s travel records. The clinic challenged the decision, and the case went to an administrative law judge.

The clinic admitted that the doctor wasn’t there on the dates of service, but it argued that the claims weren’t fraudulent because they covered services that were medically necessary and performed by other doctors on staff.

That’s not the point, said the judge. The government didn’t need to prove fraud, only an abuse of billing privileges. Under Medicare’s regulations, one way to abuse them is to bill for services that couldn’t have been furnished on that date. And one example of that is when the billing doctor was not in the state or country at the time. See 42 C.F.R. § 424.535.

So be careful out there. There have been a spate of government actions lately that used people’s travel and location data to build a case. Here’s a good article that cites a few of them. Be careful because even clerical errors can prove costly when the doctor’s not in.

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