Impaneling a Jury of Your Peers

Do you have a civil or criminal case that’s heading to trial?

Starting next year, California will have new rules for picking a jury in both types of cases.

First, the rules for criminal cases. This is Assembly Bill 1541. It brings jury selection in criminal trials more in line with the procedure for civil trials.

The process will still begin like before. The court will question the jury pool to see if anyone knows the parties or witnesses or otherwise holds a bias that will keep them from being fair and impartial. The court may also agree to ask additional questions that the lawyers have submitted in advance. Then the lawyers will get their crack at it, though the court can set reasonable limits on their questions.

The new emphasis, however, will be on giving lawyers more time and room to question the pool and follow up on the answers. The court can still set limits, but they can’t be arbitrary, inflexible, or unreasonable. In setting those limits, moreover, the court must consider the complexity of the case and even the amount of time the lawyers want. It should allow them to follow up on the court’s questions as well as their own, and it shouldn’t screen their questions beforehand unless they’re really trying to indoctrinate the jury.

Next, the rules for civil cases. This is Senate Bill 658. It makes fewer changes to existing procedure but also puts greater emphasis on letting the lawyers conduct voir dire.

How will the courts apply these rules in practice?

That’s where the rubber meets the road.

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