Patient Privacy Gives Way for Good Cause

If you’re a doctor in California, here’s a healthy reminder that the Medical Board can subpoena your patients’ records for good cause, over their objection and yours.

In a recent decision, the California Court of Appeal upheld an order that compelled a doctor to produce three of his patients’ records even though all three didn’t want them released.

It all started when the Board got a complaint from a private investigator that the doctor, an ophthalmic plastic surgeon, was billing for services he didn’t render, misrepresenting some of the services he did render, and falsifying documents.

The Board began to investigate the complaint, and later, it issued subpoenas for the three patients’ records on the ground that the doctor had departed from the standard of care in their treatment. Two of the patients wrote to the doctor to say they didn’t want their records produced and were happy with their quality of care. The third wrote that he hadn’t received notice of any subpoena, but he didn’t want his records produced, either.

The doctor moved to quash the subpoenas, and the Board opposed it and moved to compel his compliance.

The trial court sided with the Board but limited the subpoenas to a three-year range. It doesn’t appear that the patients pursued their objections in court.

On appeal, the court upheld the order, and in the process, it surveyed the case law on what constitutes good cause for breaching the privacy rights of patients.

In three prior cases, the courts had found no good cause. In one, the evidence consisted of a declaration from the Board’s investigator that supplied no facts, only a conclusion that the records “may offer evidence to substantiate” an allegation of gross negligence. In another, the Board supplied experts who suggested, based on their review of pharmacy records, that two doctors were overprescribing, but they didn’t explain why, and the doctors submitted competent evidence to rebut them.

In the most recent case, however, the court found good cause for the subpoena because of specific billing irregularities and other evidence that a doctor was overprescribing. He’d prescribe large amounts of an amphetamine to one patient. He’d prescribe to the same patients at two different pharmacies on the same day. He’d prescribe the same drugs to multiple family members and refill their prescriptions before the due date.

In this case, too, the court held that substantial evidence supported the trial court’s finding of good cause because the investigator’s partial records revealed serious problems with the claims paperwork, which the Board’s expert reviewed. In some instances, the doctor’s paperwork didn’t support the services he billed for. In others, there was no documentation at all. In some, there were no signatures; in others, no dates of service; and his reports used canned, cut-and-paste language. So the court affirmed the order.

Ratings and Reviews

10.0Mani Dabiri
Mani DabiriReviewsout of 7 reviews
The National Trial Lawyers
The National Trial Lawyers
Mani Dabiri American Bar Foundation Emblem